The Second Annual Canadian Metabolomics Conference

Canmore, Alberta, Canada

May 1st - 2nd, 2019

Arthur Edison

Arthur Edison

Art Edison received his Ph.D. in biophysics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he developed and applied NMR methods for protein structural studies under the supervision of John Markley and Frank Weinhold. In 1993, Dr. Edison joined the laboratory of Antony O. W. Stretton at the University of Wisconsin as a Jane Coffin Childs postdoctoral fellow, where he investigated the role of neuropeptides in the nervous system of the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. He joined the faculty at the University of Florida and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in 1996. Dr. Edison was the founding PI and Director of the NIH- funded Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics, and his research focuses on the role of small molecules in biology and disease.

After 19 years at the University of Florida, Dr. Edison moved to the University of Georgia as a Professor and GRA Eminent Scholar in NMR Spectroscopy in August 2015. He is a member of the Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, the Institute of Bioinformatics, and the Departments of Genetics and Biochemistry. At UGA, his group is collaborating on several new metabolomics projects from microbes to humans. He recently was awarded an NIH Common Fund Compound Identification Core center grant to improve methods for unknown compound ID in metabolomics.

Stewart Graham

Stewart Graham

Dr. Graham is from Northern Ireland where he completed his B.Sc. (Hons) in Biochemistry, M.Sc. in Bimolecular Structure and Function and Ph.D. in Metabolomics at Queen’s University Belfast between 2000 and 2009.  Following the completion of his Ph.D., Dr. Graham was employed as a post-doctoral research fellow within the School of Biological Sciences between 2009-2011 using metabolomics to identify diagnostic markers of food fraud. In his free time Dr. Graham was also actively involved in the biochemical profiling of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease which paved the way for him to receive funding from the Alzheimer’s Research Trust UK to pursue his interests in dementia research.

From 2011-2014 Dr. Graham worked as an Alzheimer’s Research Trust post-doctoral fellow where he successfully applied high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance for the first ever reported biochemical profiling of post-mortem human brain from Alzheimer’s disease sufferers.  In 2014 Dr. Graham was appointed as an honorary lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast, a position which he still holds today.  In January 2014 he was employed as the Director of the Metabolomics Division at Beaumont Health and in 2015 was appointed as assistant editor on the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease.  Further, Dr. Graham was appointed Assistant Professor at Oakland University-William Beaumont School of Medicine in 2016.  His current research interests focus mainly on the study of neurological disorders. These include: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease.  His aims are not only to identify early diagnostic biomarkers but to understand the etiology and pathogenesis of these diseases.  He believes that understanding the “mechanism” will allow for the identification and characterization of novel therapeutic targets for which the majority of the aforementioned diseases lack.

Rafael Brüschweiler

Rafael Brüschweiler

Rafael Brüschweiler is a full professor at the Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Biological Chemistry & Pharmacology at the Ohio State University, an Ohio Research Scholar, and Executive Director of CCIC NMR. He received his B.S. degree in Physics and his Ph.D. at Laboratory for Physical Chemistry at ETH, Zurich, Switzerland. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, which was followed by a Habilitation at ETH, Zurich.

Before joining OSU, he was the Carlson Chair of Chemistry at Clark University, Worcester, MA, the George Matthew Edgar Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University and the Associate Director for Biophysics at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL. He is an elected fellow of the American Physical Society and the AAAS. His research group studies metabolomics by NMR, mass spectrometry, and computation as well as protein dynamics and function by NMR and molecular dynamics computer simulations.

Hannes Rost

Hannes Rost

Hannes Rost is a bioinformatics researcher interested in high-throughput technologies that allow the study of molecular phenotype of a biological system comprehensively. He has worked on theoretical questions in targeted proteomics, contributed to the development of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and wrote the first software capable of targeted analysis of SWATH-MS data in high throughput. 

Hannes studied at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, worked with Ruedi Aebersold during his PhD and then moved to work with Mike Snyder at Stanford University to apply mass spectrometry in a personalized medicine context. In 2017, he started his own group in Toronto where he works on applying DIA to new questions in proteomics and metabolomics.

Claudio Luchinat

Claudio Luchinat

Full Professor of Chemistry at the University of Florence, Director of CERM (Center of Magnetic Resonance) and of CIRMMP (Interuniversity Consortium on Magnetic Resonance of MetalloProteins). His research interests include development of NMR-based structural methodologies, electron and nuclear relaxation, NMR of paramagnetic species, relaxometry, bioinorganic chemistry and, more recently, metabolomics.

He has held seminars in many prestigious universities and research institutions worldwide, and plenary lectures in International Workshops, Symposia and Conferences. He has been awarded the 1989 gold medal "Raffaello Nasini", the 1994 Premio Federchimica "For an Intelligent Future", the 1996 European Medal for Biological Inorganic Chemistry by SBIC, the 2001 GDRM gold medal, and recently the Premio Sapio 2017 and the prestigious Richard R. Ernst Prize in Magnetic Resonance (2018). His Scholar h-index is 80, and his papers have been quoted more than 25.000 times.

Ian Lewis

Ian Lewis

Dr. Ian Lewis is an assistant professor and Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions Translational Health Chair in Metabolomics in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Calgary. Lewis earned a PhD in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and completed his postdoctoral training at Princeton University.

Dr. Lewis was recruited by UCalgary to launch a research program that harnesses state-of-the-art technology to detect and combat infectious diseases. As a part of this program, Lewis built the Calgary Metabolomics Research Facility (CMRF), an analytical lab that specializes in unravelling the complex host-pathogen metabolic interactions that occur during infections. Recently, he partnered with Calgary Laboratory Services to launch a suite of new diagnostic tools and treatment practices that may significantly reduce the number of people who die from infections.